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Archive for Friday 15 January 2010

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CuriousWorks spends a lot of time in high-schools doing workshops that are an eclectic mix of art, theatre and multimedia exercises. These workshops are constantly evolving and changing and many ...

CuriousWorks spends a lot of time in high-schools doing workshops that are an eclectic mix of art, theatre and multimedia exercises. These workshops are constantly evolving and changing and many are influenced by websites and artists who inspire us. We thought we’d share some of the websites that are the shoulders we stand on and inspire our work. If there’s any great sites we’ve forgotten you can add them in the comments.

1. Make Zine Blog

Make Zine is a great website that has loads of DIY projects that are perfect for a high-school Design and Technology class. http://blog.makezine.com

2. Craft Zine Blog

Craft Zine is the Home Economics sibling to Make Zine. Instead of screwdrivers and soldering irons it’s projects that use hot-glue, sewing machines and felt. http://blog.craftzine.com

3. Instructables

A brilliant website for science classes, design and tech, just about any subject at school really. Instructables has DIY projects for literally any machine/invention/concoction you can think of. A great resource for high-school students to be engaged with and contribute to. http://www.instructables.com

4. Howtoons

Howtoons is a brilliant idea, a science and technology site made using comics. This website is aimed at upper primary and early secondary kids and does a great job of making science exciting and accessible. Their blog is updated regularly and finds science news that kids will actually be interested in. http://www.howtoons.com

5. Learning to Love You More

This is a website created by the artist Miranda July and it lists a number of art assignments for visitors to complete. You can then upload your assignments to share with everyone else on the site. I can’t think of another website/art project that better defines “community”. I think this would be great for Year 10 art class. http://learningtoloveyoumore.com

6. TED

Remember those boring science documentaries you had to watch at school? The TED conference takes a Large Hadron Collider and smashers boring science into obcsure sub-atomic particles. There are videos that cover a whole number of different subject categories across science and the humanities. Kids in high-school should be watching at least one of these videos each week. http://www.ted.com

7. Deviant Art

Despite the suspect name that will probably put a lot of teachers off, Deviant Art is a fantastic online community for high-school students to upload and share their own personal artworks with. As oppossed to Myspace and Bebo, Deviant Art is all about being creative and productive and sharing your work with your peers. Highly recommended. http://www.deviantart.com

8. NSW State Library Online Collection

The State Library has an online archive of some very old and fascinating documents. You can explore the journals and notes of Sir Joseph Banks, Matthew Flinders and Miles Franklin. Probably one for the older kids but really interesting when you start digging. http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/about/collections/online.html

9. Fun Brain

Fun Brain is not your typical online video game website. All the games have some kind of educational bent and there is also a comics section as well. This site more suited to younger students, but I’ve spent many a time there myself. http://www.funbrain.com

10. Google Maps

Google Maps has a great new feature called “My Maps” which allows users to add and upload their own content to a map and share it with friends or the public. This is a great tool for field trips and school excursions. You could create an interactive worksheet by having a map that students use to upload their answers. http://maps.google.com

And two great how-tos from our very own Peter Cossey!

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Yesterday Indonesia announced it will force the 240 asylum-seekers on board the Jaya Lestari into detention, by gun point if necessary. “This is our nation, so why can’t we (use ...

Yesterday Indonesia announced it will force the 240 asylum-seekers on board the Jaya Lestari into detention, by gun point if necessary.

“This is our nation, so why can’t we (use force) in the name of our sovereignty? After all, this has all only happened because we followed an Australian request”, says the senior immigration official Harry Purwanto.

Will the go to the Australian-funded detention centre in Tanjung Pinang? Stay tuned…

A neat twist at the end of the article..

“Sanjeev “Alex” Kuhendrarajah, a spokesman for those on board, said if there were former fighters on the Jaya Lestari, “they should have more credibility in their request for asylum than even a regular refugee because they really are fleeing for their lives”.

Some thoughtful words from Suvendrini Perera

“I do not agree with those who describe conditions in Sri Lanka as amounting to genocide against Tamils. But the interests of three governments — Sri Lankan, Australian, Indonesian — now converge in whitewashing the undeniable dangers that would face the people of the Jaya Lestari if they were returned. Platitudes about the “damage to our international reputation” aside, can Australians face up to what would amount, in all but name, to a refoulement, or expulsion, of certified refugees and asylum seekers to a place they fled because of a very well-founded fear of persecution?”

Who’s Hearing The People Smuggling 'Message’? New Matilda 15 Dec 2009

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From Jeff Sparrows article in Crikey Wednesday, 13 January 2010 http://www.crikey.com.au/2010/01/13/asio-not-the-government-calling-the-shots-on-refugees/ > “Now, one presumes that the adverse judgement about the Tamil refugees relates, in some way, to the Tamil ...

From Jeff Sparrows article in Crikey

Wednesday, 13 January 2010 

< http://www.crikey.com.au/2010/01/13/asio-not-the-government-calling-the-shots-on-refugees/ >

“Now, one presumes that the adverse judgement about the Tamil refugees relates, in some way, to the Tamil Tigers. Given the Parkin case, it seems pertinent to wonder what role the Sri Lankan government has played in the current assessment. After all, it’s already been alleged that Sri Lankan officials have been allowed to question Tamils in Indonesia. That would be, mind you, representatives of the same Sri Lankan government leading an army caught on camera systematically shooting prisoners , a government with one of the worst human rights records in the world, and a documented tendency to regard all Tamils as terrorists; indeed, the same government whose persecution has led to the Tamils being officially declared refugees.”

...and Liz45 post in the comments

“What I find amazing is the mixed messages here. If these people(including the babes) have been recognised as needing protection by UNHCR, then who do they need protection from, and why have they been deemed a security threat? To whom? The Sri Lankan govt that has very serious questions to answer re assassinating Tamil people near the end of the ‘war’? Did ASIO get their info from thugs in the govt of Sri Lanka? I guess 20 yrs ago, Nelson Mandela would’ve been denied a visa too, on the say so of the genocidal and corrupt govt of Sth Africa at the time. Perhaps ASIO could’ve interviewed Steve Biko re the facts, but he was probably dead at the time; murdered by the same racist corrupt and genocidal govt!”

http://www.crikey.com.au/2010/01/13/asio-not-the-government-calling-the-shots-on-refugees/#comment-53717

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